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Category: Autism

This post is intended to give a very brief overview of Autism from where you may like to find more information via the links or talk with you GP for advice

Not impressed

Not impressed

Always a greeting

For a few days, I have to take part in civil duties. That means I will be away each day. Our son continues to be cared for and watched over by my wife and his Aunt, but I’ll not pretend the absence of myself or my wife for such long periods of time is not easy for him to come to terms with. He lets us know in many ways how much he is ‘not impressed’

We will get through it and he will get through it, and keeping him active is even more important during this time.

He’s not alone in being affected by this as we realise that Lady Bronte has grown accustomed to our routines now as well. Almost anticipating what we will do when and being ready to join in. Always with an ear on the door or the car engine when one of us is out, desperate for that little sign or sound that we are returning.

We don’t leave her alone or caged, even for a short time, and she comes with us everywhere. When we did recently all have to go out, we took advantage of a lovely ‘pet-sitter’ who lives nearby and who took her walking and swimming for the time we were away. socialising with other dogs too, she had a ball.

In the next two to three weeks we are hoping she will be joined by a new feline sister. A 14 year old cat that we are adopting into the family. We have always had cats around the house and Lady Bronte was fabulous with our last cat, who has sadly passed away now and we don’t want to leave it too long before she is reintroduced to one. Before Lady Bronte, we had a golden Labrador (Jasper) who also had a very good relationship both with our son and with the cats we had then.

Our son also learns so much by having animals around. It helps greatly with his understanding relationships as he does bond with the cats and dogs far more easily than people. One of the autistic symptoms relates to his inability to strike relationships and is not too comfortable in other peoples company. With our cats and dogs, he is so much more at ease, and holds many conversations with them, seemingly as if he gets an answer back.

It is important as well, as he sees the need to care for them, exercising them, feeding them, ensuring they have fresh water throughout the day, sensing when they are unwell or want to play. We go shopping at the supermarket and our son takes responsibility for reminding me to buy food and choosing something for them.

During this period I’m away for much of the day, Lady Bronte will play an important role – unbeknown to her – in ensuring our son remains focused on these things until I get home.

Animals are well documented as a form of assistance for many illnesses, disabilities and age and the relationship that is struck up, particularly with those with autism, can been very rewarding. Dogs and Horses in particular seem to have an ability to calm the anxieties of those with autism.

Autism

Autism

Autism (NHS Choices)

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a condition that affects social interaction, communication, interests and behaviour. It includes Asperger syndrome and childhood autism.

The signs of ASD typically start to develop in childhood.

It’s estimated about 1 in every 100 people in the UK has ASD. More boys are diagnosed with it than girls.

There’s no “cure” for ASD, but a range of educational and behavioural support programmes can help people with the condition.

Read about help and support available for people with ASD.

Signs and symptoms

People with ASD tend to have problems with social interaction and communication.

They can find it hard to understand other people’s emotions and feelings, and have difficulty starting conversations or taking part in them properly. Language development may be delayed.

People with ASD are often only interested in certain things, have repetitive behaviours, and like to stick to a set routine. They tend to get upset if these routines are disrupted.

Children and young people with ASD frequently experience a range of cognitive (thinking), learning, emotional and behavioural problems. For example, they may also have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety, or depression.

About half of those with ASD have some degree of learning difficulty. However, many people are able to be independent with appropriate support.

Read more about the symptoms of ASD.